Animals, Author, Ghostwriting, Mental Health Awareness, Uncategorized, Writing

About Inspiration & Silliness

Two words unlikely to appear in the same sentence, yet have a fascinating connection, are ‘inspiration’ and ‘silliness’.

When we feel inspired it’s supposed to move us, to motivate us, to keep us moving forward in our lives. Whereas silliness seems to have little substance in adult life, apart from acceptance on television or during peer-pressured drunkenness.

So you may be wondering why I have chosen to write a blog post about these words.

Well, now I’ve officially been an adult for over a decade, I have learned many valuable lessons – one of the most interesting being that silliness can evolve into inspiration.

Anyone who knows me knows I love to make people smile and laugh. It drives me to do all I can to make our world a brighter, more cheerful, kinder place. Although it happens frequently, I still get a wonderful buzz when someone approaches me for help or advice. And to be able earn a living doing something I’m passionate about, whilst making other people’s dreams come true, is an honour as well as a privilege.

A lot of the time adult life calls for us to be serious. Whether that’s maintaining professional mannerisms when dealing with clients, or deciding which provider to choose for your mortgage, or even managing the expectations of those around you because even though you love them dearly and know they love you no-matter what, you still don’t want to disappoint them. All this seriousness means we live 90% of our lives in a heightened state of stress – the other 10% is spent sleeping, or trying to sleep. Some people deal with this stress better than others – I am reminded of this on a daily basis, since sooo many people I know ‘have it together’ according to social media, whereas I still forget to eat lunch most workdays, and have been known to accidentally use deodorant instead of dry shampoo.

This got me to thinking, why does life have to be this way? Why must we all be seen to live such bustling lives to be regarded successful? Why do I allow myself to feel like a blob, and want to cwtch up in my baggiest jumper, whenever I see photos of confident women, wearing whatever the heck they want, even when they’re curvier than I am and have already had like three kids? Why do I beat myself up about not being able to ride my horses often enough, let alone compete them like I used to, despite the fact I have a chronic hand injury that drastically limits my capabilities?

Realisation struck today that the answers to those questions lie heavily upon the curse of social media goggles. It’s that ‘rose-tinted glasses’ affect, but far worse. Glasses grace your face and help you see whilst allowing for peripheral vision, yet goggles give you no choice as to your peripheral vision since they’re strapped tightly to your head. So tightly in fact, that when you eventually take them off, you’re left with red marks around your eyes, the effects of which take time to fade.

Maybe it’s about time we removed those goggles and viewed social media in its true light – as a form of media. When you read a fiction book or watch a blockbuster film, you fully expect scenes written to perfection, every detail taken care of, every character the idealistic image of an aspect of humanity. Despite the fact social media was designed to represent our everyday lives, we forget that it is just another form of media. People won’t share what they don’t want us to see (unless they’re really, really brave!). Silliness seems to have no place in a world striving for perfection. But, just as with fiction books and blockbuster films, we shouldn’t trust what we see on social media as being the full story. Behind every book you read there’s been an entire production team, often including authors or ghostwriters, editors, agents, and publishing companies. Same goes for blockbuster films – I guarantee if it’s big budget, there’s an entire team dedicated to each minuscule portion of that film’s development and production. And whilst we’ve been fooled into thinking social media harnesses each individual voice, algorithms working behind the scenes are what determines the content we see. Therefore, it shapes how we feel about social media, as opposed to allowing us to connect directly with the hundreds of people we ‘follow’ or are ‘friends’ with, and making our own minds up about them. That masterful direction means we are being exposed to an edited version of people, even people we see every day in person. For all its awesomeness, social media cannot replace true human connection.

Social media should not dictate that which defines us as ‘successful’. We are unique. Success is different for each of us.

So, actually, life doesn’t have to be stressful in order for us to be regarded successful. If you look back over your life and recognise that you’re in a healthier, happier place than you were a year or two ago, then congratulations – you’re winning!

Social media makes me feel like I should be going to a gym then sharing my sculpted form with ‘followers’ or ‘friends’, and buying expensive clothes that flatter my figure that I should post all over my social media profiles to show off, and I should learn to perfect make-up/camera-angles in order to attract higher-paying clients, and I should be posting 50 updates a day about what I’m doing to reach to a wider audience, and I should have my life in such great order that every day is prosperous. But do you know what, my respect for all these amazing women and men who seem capable of juggling every aspect of their life shouldn’t end with them, it should extend to myself.

I have to stop caring what social media has conditioned me to believe represents success. I am a powerful woman because I have overcome some horrible experiences and worked unbelievably hard to get to the fortunate position I am in today. I shall continue to work tirelessly to inspire an even better tomorrow, so I am going to stop allowing social media to make me feel like I’m not worthy, because you know what? I damn well am! Are you with me? I’d love to hear your success stories – whether that extends to writing a bestselling novel, or running an excellent charity, or something as seemingly humble as being a good person in a self-centred world. Because you, my friend, are marvelous and it’s about time someone noticed 🙂

And just so you know this isn’t empty narrative, I’ll include some of the silliness I’ve participated in over the last few days that inspired me to write this post…

Life can be tough, but it can also be amazing.

Stay well, stay safe, and please, keep smiling… <3

Best wishes,

Dannika

Uncategorized, Writing

About the Art of Writing

Hello, for the third time today!

I promise I’ll stop sharing blog posts for the rest of the day 🙂

Third and final blog post of the day is another revived post from an older blog of mine – I hope you enjoy this post.

Writing is an essential part of life. Harbouring the power to change our world, the written word still holds such enchantment and discovery, despite the digital age.

Here, I share some inspirational words from fantastical writers…

Anna Sewell, author of my all-time favourite book Black Beauty, made such an impact with her work that it led to improvements in equine welfare; such as removal of the ‘bearing rein’ and inspired the provision of water troughs for over-worked horses in Victorian towns/cities.

“Now I say that with cruelty and oppression it is everybody’s business to interfere when they see it.”

“We call them dumb animals, and so they are, for they cannot tell us how they feel, but they do not suffer less because they have no words.”

“There is no religion without love, and people may talk as much as they like about their religion, but if it does not teach them to be good and kind to man and beast it is all a sham.”

“Master said, God had given men reason, by which they could find out things for themselves; but he had given animals knowledge which did not depend on reason, and which was much more prompt and perfect in its way, and by which they had often saved the lives of men.”

Nobody will ever forget the changes inspired by Martin Luther King Jr. A civil rights activist, he believed in non-violent protest – succeeding in changing perspectives and encouraging equality.


“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”

“I still have a dream, a dream deeply rooted in the American dream – one day this nation will rise up and live up to its creed, ‘We hold these truths to be self evident: that all men are created equal.’ I have a dream…”

J.K.Rowling, famous for creating the wizarding world of Harry Potter, is one of the most influential authors of our time! Her words inspire that hard work and dedication make dreams come true.


“Anything’s possible if you’ve got enough nerve.”

“You control your own life. Your own will is extremely powerful.”

“I believe in hard work and luck, and the first often leads to the second.”

“It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all – in which case, you fail by default.”

Roald Dahl’s stories have been captivating the imagination of children for generations. Everyone can remember their favourite story of his.


“You can have a wonky nose and a crooked mouth and a double-chin and stick-out teeth, but if you have good thoughts it will shine out of your face like sunbeams and you will always look lovely.”

“Those who don’t believe in magic will never find it.”

Although not an author, Macklemore’s lyricism is fantastic. When you cut through the surrounding profanity and filler, listening to lyrics uncovers surprisingly insightful depth within the words.


“No law is gonna change us, we have to change us. Whatever God you believe in, we come from the same one. Strip away the fear underneath it’s all the same love.”

“The quickest way to happiness? Learning to be selfless. Ask more questions. Talk about yourself less.”

“I might not be the same but that’s not important. No freedom ’til we’re equal, damn right I support it.”

“The greats weren’t great because at birth they could paint. The greats were great because they paint a lot.”

It is an ultimate dream of mine that my own words might one day make a difference to the world for the better too 🙂

What writing most inspires you?

Please keep creating – I’m going to <3

Best wishes,

Dannika